Birds – Nature’s Best Engineers!

Human indeed has developed himself past several years in various disciplines of improving lifestyles. Concerning my blogs so far, we have seen about many buildings and monuments which are built by cement concrete, bricks, rocks, marbles, etc. Can anything think about a construction without these materials?

The answer is definitely a big NO! as the question of strength and durability comes into picture. But there’s someone else who builds a house for himself without these materials and any equipments, without anyone’s help and still much stronger withstanding all weather exposures. Something extraordinary about it’s identification is … It’s not an engineer!

Yes, birds are well best suited in these aspects to build their every nest unique and phenomenal to their species. It’s really an incredible thing to be wondered of having no knowledge of civil engineering, no any education university, no cement, no reinforcement and even no economy. Whenever we think about bird nests, most people may imagine the regular bowl-shaped receptacle of twigs and leaves, but birds nesting behaviours are as diverse as their courting rituals. If you keep your eyes peeled throughout late March and April, you may be able to see evidence of this remarkable workmanship taking place around you.

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But how do birds, with only beaks as tools, turn these basic components into nests secure enough to take a growing family of nestlings, vying for their parent’s attentions and stretching their wings?

Baya Weaver bird’s nest

It would seem that beaks are very good tools for building. The weaver bird starts making a knot with a long blade of grass. Eventually then builds a circular structure, weaving blades using his beak and feet to built a ball-shaped nest. It’s a delicate business of the weaving in new material to create the nest cup.

Hummingbird’s nest

Hummingbirds are also one of the great wonders in all of nature; so tiny, yet so perfect. This North American creature builds tiny luxurious nests in trees or shrubs, mostly using plant fibers, downy feathers and animal hair, bound together by spider silk.

Hamerkop bird’s nest

Hamerkop, an African bird’s nest is a massive, roofed structure set up in the fork of a tree near water. 10,000 twigs, lined with mud for insulation and water-proofing takes months to construct a nest; surprisingly they aren’t satisfied with one, ought to built-up 4 nests every year, working all the year round.

Edible-nest swiflet

Nest from saliva!!! Edible-nest of Swiftlet is made exclusively out of the bird’s saliva. It is built in layers, usually over protruding rocks on inclined walls of a dark sea cave. Swiftlets nest in colonies of thousands!

Long tailed Tailorbird’s nest

The nest of Common Tailorbird is the end-product of ingenious needlework by the bird. Armed with its beak and a silk thread, the tailorbird pierces the edges of a large leaf and stitches them together. It builds its nest in the frame of the arched leaf. The nests are well-camouflaged as they are built among thick foliage.

Hole in bark of tree for Owl’s nest

A less labour-intensive way to make a nest is to use a hole that already exists. Many birds, including owls, take advantage of natural holes in trees as a ready-made place to bring up their young. While, the woodpeckers nest in cavities drilled into living pine trees. It takes years for a breeding pair to excavate one.

59 thoughts on “Birds – Nature’s Best Engineers!

  1. Indeed…Hearing birds voice in lockdown gives pleasure…Finally they are living their life which is pollution-free!!! We need to create awareness and this blog can change the mindset for sure. Great words Shreya. Keep it up!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh yes! There are many such unique structures made by birds and are listed in most incredible nests!!!
      Baya’s nest takes couple of weeks to complete. If you’ve seen it, then you might be knowing that it also has reverse windings to strengthen more. They are simply great☺️

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have seen some bird nests here in Canada. But, these nests you have shown are just spectacular ! It is hard to believe a bird made them all ! Thank you very much for showing these and sharing them with us !!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. भारी … We (civil engineer) should encourage from the Birds …. To make a different & logical ideas rather than typical construction ideas..

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Another great post! Nature is not only a wonder of beauty but we can learn so much from other creatures here with us. To think of how we strive so hard with all we have and to see wonders from far less is awe-inspiring!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, absolutely! I mentioned a few of these nest examples uniquely in each kind, to know their diversity, its own characteristics and unboxing unheard facts. They’re always a wonder of beauty✨
      Thanks for liking it 😊 keep supporting

      Like

  5. Ces photos sont splendides – je suis émerveillée 🙂 J’ai toujours vécu entourée d’oiseaux, même à Paris – et dans le jardin de mes parents, il y avait des chouettes dans un grand arbre touffu juste en face de ma chambre – au moins une …
    Merci – amitiés 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Merci beaucoup de l’avoir aimé 😊. Cela semble si bon que vous êtes si près des oiseaux et des hiboux. Ils sont incroyables de connaître de plus près et de varier. Je suis tellement contente que tu aies aimé!

      Like

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